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Robert Braden

Computing and Internet pioneer, now pursuing smart grid communication and anonymity, who helped shape and record evolution of Internet protocols.

ISI News

Test Drive: Terry Benzel Joins California Transportation Commission Evaluation

California is known both for a cheery, idealized car culture and the grinding reality of traffic and sometimes dangerously polluted air. Undergirding those opposing images: 50,000 miles of aging roads, highways and freeways that continually must be maintained and repaired with gas-tax funding.

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What's Going On: Answering Questions With Web Corpora

Pedro Szekely understands dark matter in an all-too- human, not cosmological, universe. Beginning in 2015, his work with Craig Knoblock on sophisticated, cloud-based analytics has generated substantial media attention for its ability to expose human trafficking hidden deeply online.

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Root Matters: ISI Greatly Enhances Internet Root Server

The USC Information Sciences Institute launched a second physical site of the Internet root server it manages on May 2, greatly boosting the service's ability to fulfill an unusual, dual mandate.

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Feature Story

Unlocking the Gate: ISI Team Wins Recognition for New FPGA Approach

July 13, 2017

A team headed by Matthew French, a senior supervising computer scientist at the USC Information Sciences Institute, is garnering attention for a novel approach to coding field programmable gate array (FPGA) chips.

The work won Best Short Paper at the 25th IEEE Field-Programmable Custom Computing Machines symposium in May this year, and more recently was covered by the Xilinx, Inc. industry journal and by The Next Platform, a United Kingdom-based news site. "It's one thing to think your own work is exciting," says French. "It's another when it reverberates through the research community."

His team's aim: to enable scientists to take advantage of FPGA hardware capabilities without needing to understand their complex, underlying functionality. Where conventional chips generally perform fixed functions, FPGAs are designed to be customized and reconfigured post-manufacturing. Hardware can be tailored on the fly without physically swapping out chips, which eliminates the need to create new custom interfaces for every new hardware function. The programmable chips also can offer dramatic speed gains over their conventional cousins. But FPGAs remain notoriously difficult to code and use.Read More

ISI Annual Report

View the 2016 ISI Annual Report.

Events

Unless otherwise noted, seminars are open to the public.

Aug 02Prof. Fabio MassacciCyber Security Seminar

The Work Averse Attacker Model: the *real* attacker model and its evidence from 2millions attack signatures.

2:00pm - 3:00pm PDT
Aug 04Andres AbelukAI Seminar - Interview talk

Optimizing Collective Behavior in Cultural Markets

11:00am - 12:00pm PDT
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Feature Story

Unlocking the Gate: ISI Team Wins Recognition for New FPGA Approach

July 13, 2017

A team headed by Matthew French, a senior supervising computer scientist at the USC Information Sciences Institute, is garnering attention for a novel approach to coding field programmable gate array (FPGA) chips.

The work won Best Short Paper at the 25th IEEE Field-Programmable Custom Computing Machines symposium in May this year, and more recently was covered by the Xilinx, Inc. industry journal and by The Next Platform, a United Kingdom-based news site. "It's one thing to think your own work is exciting," says French. "It's another when it reverberates through the research community."

His team's aim: to enable scientists to take advantage of FPGA hardware capabilities without needing to understand their complex, underlying functionality. Where conventional chips generally perform fixed functions, FPGAs are designed to be customized and reconfigured post-manufacturing. Hardware can be tailored on the fly without physically swapping out chips, which eliminates the need to create new custom interfaces for every new hardware function. The programmable chips also can offer dramatic speed gains over their conventional cousins. But FPGAs remain notoriously difficult to code and use.Read More